AP classes. They can be the building blocks of a college application or just an outlet of exploring deeper into one’s interests. College Board defines AP courses as “rigorous, college-level classes in a variety of subjects that give students an opportunity to gain the skills and experience colleges recognize.”

Indeed, College Board offered rigor in courses in various subject areas such as arts, world languages, or history and social science. However, courses offered have been generally “discipline-specific” and is independent of one another unless they pertain to the same branch of study.

via college board

via college board

That was the case until the introduction of the AP Capstone program in the fall of 2014. To provide a brief logistics of the course, the program is divided into two parts: Seminar and Research, the latter taken after successfully completing the former. Few among many of the course’s focus are research and making arguments so that by the end, students taking the course are capable of doing college-level research and writing research papers at the equivalent level.

Past students of the program describe it to be “extensive” or “all-encompassing” and a place that you could “escape superficiality.” Some say it is a new type of experience that is like “MUN combined with writing” and is an “exciting adventure to mystery treasure island.”

via college board

via college board

people described the course, all agreed that the AP Capstone program was a place to find who they are and to pursue their true interests. Many, including the instructors of the course, stressed that if the students who take the course focus on topics that will make them look impressive, they will not be able to reap anything after completing the Capstone program.

AP Capstone is currently in its 3rd year running pilot programs and is offered in few schools in South Korea along with hundred others around the world.